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1st avenue
commercial office

repp design & construction
2502 n 1st avenue
tucson, az 85719

The 1st Avenue Commercial office re-imagines an abandoned 30-year-old block retail building into a light-filled and open 5,640sf commercial office space. The primary challenge for this transformational adaptive-reuse project was the west façade and main entry. The existing building did not successfully address the street, had undesirable solar heat gain and glare, and poor vehicular/pedestrian separation. Mindful of the project budget, the renovation centers on a custom steel structure on the west façade that addresses these many problems while also defining a landscaped courtyard. This newly created feature not only provides a unique image for the building but also supports solar panels that power the building and screens water harvesting cisterns.

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007 house

rob paulus architects
701 n country club road
tucson, az

The 007 House, designed for a single guy in his mid 30's, draws upon the slick and cool ideal of a modern bachelor pad. Constrained by formidable setbacks, a small site and a tight budget, the home went vertical and below grade to maximize the exterior area and create functional indoor/outdoor living. Two insulated masonry walls define the east and west enclosures while floor to ceiling glass faces north and south. Designed as a loft, the interior emphasizes light and space, with detail relegated to functional components such as the stair, railing, and cabinetry as well as at the juncture of dissimilar materials. A large canopy cantilevers out to the south to shade the interior from the harsh desert sun while establishing an edge for the southern courtyard. A native mesquite tree becomes the centerpiece of the courtyard, injecting a natural element into the rectilinear, manmade composition.

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990 offices

rob paulus architects
990 e 17th street
tucson, az

The 990 Office transforms a 30-year-old auto repair shop into an efficient and inspiring multi-tenant professional office space. Located in a mixed industrial and residential neighborhood, the building plays off neighboring residential adaptive-reuse and urban infill projects in proportion and materiality as it completes the block with a common sensitivity to smart urban development. Sustainable design was also critical. The building employs passive solar orientation, a heavily insulated enclosure system, efficient day lighting strategies and a new aluminum rain screen to create an efficient and inspiring work environment. Additionally, 3000-gallons of underground rainwater catchment actively irrigate landscaping and 300 square feet of raised bed organic garden. Inside, an undulating wood ceiling, resembling the form of a violin, provides spatial interest and acoustic relief. Lush Sonoran Desert planting, fractured rock from another project’s excavation and a re-purposed jet cowling sculpture enliven the outdoor spaces to create an oasis with shade and plant color.

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barrio metalico

rob paulus architects
1010-1040 e 17th street
739-747 s fremont avenue
1025-1035 e 18th street
tucson, az

Barrio Metalico transforms a forgotten area near downtown Tucson into a vibrant mixed-use neighborhood. Nine freestanding 1,570sf single-family loft residences, positioned on two distinct sites and developed in conjunction with a neighboring loft, offer space and light accented with wood and steel details. Full height corner windows overlook mountain and courtyard views. On the exterior, the simplicity of the Metalico wedge shape is contrasted with the rough texture of salvaged wood and steel fencing along with existing adobe walls at the property edge. Round rainwater harvesting tanks provide storage for watering indigenous plantings. Energy efficiency is maximized with highly insulated wall and roof enclosures. Solar panels provide power to vehicular gates and each unit is pre-plumbed for solar hot water.

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college of architecture
and landscape
architecture

jones studio
university of arizona
1501 e speedway blvd
tucson, az 85719

The College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture celebrates the symbiotic relationship between architecture and landscape. Over time, yellow orchid vines will envelop and shade the entire southern face of the expansion, embodying the intertwining of the two design disciplines. Windows throughout the building also illustrate a sensitive balance between architecture and nature through the use of passive solar concepts: maximum openings on the north, controlled openings on the south, and minimal east/west openings achieve natural light with minimal solar gain. As a working laboratory for sustainable practices, the building serves as a living, changing teaching tool for students and the public. A water conservation demonstration garden showcases five Arizona ecosystems watered with rainwater captured from the roof deck and HVAC condensate. Exposed building systems are easily recognized and analyzed by students. Additionally, the roof functions as an outdoor studio for exploring Sonoran Desert green roof strategies and offers a place where student solar projects can be developed.

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stevie eller
dance theater

gould evans
university of arizona
1737 e university blvd
tucson, az 85719

Dance, movement, and the integration of art into architecture inspired the University of Arizona Stevie Eller Dance Theater. The 300-seat theatre complete with orchestra pit, indoor/outdoor lobby, outdoor stage, scene shop and costume shop anchors itself on the campus mall allowing the practice room to balance over ‘dancing columns.’ Designed to look like dancer’s legs and inspired by traditional dance notation, the columns offer a playful expression of the activity inside. The columns not only represent the interior function but are also part of a desire to extend dance performance into the community. The glass box above is the dancers’ practice room with floor-to-ceiling glass offering the dancers expansive views of campus while also turning their daily practices into public performances. Additionally, the soft upholstered space of the auditorium rolls and bends to become an exterior woven wire rusted fabric scrim that evokes movement through its cascading form.

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james e. rogers
college of law
commons renovation

gould evans
university of arizona
1201 e speedway
tucson, az 85721

The University of Arizona College of Law renovation transforms dark, low, insular spaces into open, day lit volumes where students can study, socialize, and relax in a visually connected, socially accessible environment. Natural light was strategically introduced into the building’s core by peeling away existing exterior concrete panels at key moments while also unplugging a previously truncated central atrium and opening it to the sky. New glazing integrated with shade systems that mimic the form of the previously removed concrete panels mark the moments where the old façade has been peeled away while bringing filtered daylight to a modernized library, indoor / outdoor study areas, spaces for student organizations and faculty, and state-of-the-art classrooms.

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meinel optical sciences building

richard + bauer
university of arizona
1630 e university blvd
tucson, az 85719

The Meinel Optical Sciences addition is an abstraction of a camera obscura. Within the simple volume, daylight is introduced through strategic apertures in the copper skin. Vertical light shafts penetrate the full height of the building, each featuring an optical effect, and terminate with two-story interaction spaces that integrate natural daylight into users’ daily activities. Additionally, integrating with the campus was critical. Located on the University Mall, the building is folded into the landscape to reduce its overall height. A series of terraced plazas transition visitors from the mall into the below-grade double-height lobby with views of the terraced vegetation. Floating above the mall, a rain screen made of reddened copper alloy treated to recall the color of the campus brick sheathes the cast in place concrete building. The northern glass wall undulates as a response to the existing building’s textural facades and is also an interpretation of a Fresnel lens.

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patrick k. hardesty
midtown multi
service center

architekton
glhn architects & engineers
1100 s alvernon
tucson, az 85711

Evoking images of the Santa Catalina Mountains’ sculpted canyons, a sinuous steel wall defines Tucson's Midtown Multi-Service Center. Located along the 100-year floodplain, this wall provides security and defines a new arroyo that separates the public parking from the main facility. A pedestrian bridge leads to a fissure that bisects the steel wall and defines the public entry. Once inside, the space opens into a breezeway where the community room cantilevers over the wash as an expressive element. In contrast with the building’s sculptural form, the organization maintains a rational response to program. A precast structural grid is defined by vehicular uses on the lower level while the main floor organizes around a central commons with orthogonally radiating circulation. At home in its desert climate, the project performs 25% better than baseline standards. A well-insulated envelope paired with a high efficiency mechanical system, day lit spaces, and photovoltaic panels help offset energy usage.

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one north fifth

rob paulus architects
1 n 5th street
tucson, az

The re-adaptation and repositioning of the 1969 Martin Luther King Jr. building represents a major step forward to breathing new life into the east end of downtown Tucson. Situated adjacent to the thriving Hotel Congress and the newly renovated Rialto Theater, the One North Fifth project fills in the corner of Congress and Fifth Avenue and reconnects the urban fabric of downtown with 9,000 square feet of new retail/commercial space at street level. Long thought of as a brutish block of a building with a bad rap, the 96 former elderly housing units-turned market-rate apartments are completely reworked to look better and function more efficiently while saving a 38 year old building that was otherwise destined for the landfill. This tight-budget transformation has been pivotal in garnering momentum for the rebuilding of downtown Tucson into the thriving, bustling center it once was.

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university of arizona
poetry center

line and space, llc
university of arizona
1508 e helen street
tucson, az 85721

Contradictions were inherent when placing a valuable collection within an active university community resource. The University of Arizona Poetry Center’s function and program required balancing opposites: active discourse and quiet solitude, natural light for reading and protection from the sun’s destructive nature, intimacy with books and the reality of the massive presence of 50,000 shelved volumes, and, of course, security while making poetry accessible to all. In response, the building is organized as a sequence of movement from noisy gathering space to a quiet contemplation garden. Acting through transitions, the building creates gentle thermal and visual transitions from inside to outside, blurs the distinction between garden and stacks, and provides sheltered, tempered, outdoor gathering space.

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quincie douglas
branch library

richard + bauer
71585 e 36th street
tucson, az 85713

The Quincie Douglas Branch Library is organized as a single open volume under expansive shading roof forms. The floating roof stretches generously over the entry as it lends drama to the space and captures panoramic mountain views to the north. The floating form is more than a formal gesture – it is also lifted to balance north and south daylight while shading the interior from direct solar gain. A bright red elliptical staff area marks the entry and acts as a formal foil to the roof as it guides patrons inside the building. The discrete areas – meeting room, group room, computer rooms, and the children’s area – are located along the southern edge under the lowest portion of the roof. The higher volume is preserved for the open collection and reading areas. An accessible exterior reading court captures panoramic views of the mountains to the north.

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strategic alternative
learning techniques
(salt) center

gould evans
university of arizona
1010 n highland ave
tucson, az 85721

The SALT Center provides services to students with learning disabilities and furnishes support to learning disability research and community outreach programs. The vision for this nationally recognized program was to provide a series of concentrated learning atmospheres within an intimate yet public environment focused on supporting a culturally diverse community of learners. Located at the north edge of the University of Arizona campus, the 16,000 square foot SALT Center grounds itself parallel to one of the University’s busiest pedestrian corridors. Spatial carvings become spatial projections to animate Highland’s pedestrian corridor. Simultaneously, the carved entry directs visitors through a 50’ wide breezeway that leads to the heart of the facility, the courtyard. The intimate courtyard, nestled under a canopy of palo breas, is the catalyst for academic and social exchange, centered within a double height tutoring lab, computer commons, second floor balcony, instructional offices, computer laboratories, tutorial spaces, meeting rooms, and a lounge.